Doc.new — quick and little-known way to create Google docs, sheets, slides and forms

Doc.new — quick and little-known way to create Google docs, sheets, slides and forms

Have you ever wished you could find a more efficient way to create a new document, table, presentation or form in Google? Let's break down an interesting way that not many people know about.

In the age of artificial intelligence and advanced digital solutions, it's amazing how often we find ourselves scrambling through a plethora of options and buttons to accomplish the simplest of tasks.

But let's dive into something simple and concise. Type "doc.new" into your browser's address bar - this takes you to a blank slate of a new document in Google's ecosystem, bypassing the traditional path of navigating the Google Drive user interface.

You might be thinking: how does this domain work? Can it be used for other Google services?

The answer is you can. Google has used this extension to simplify the experience for several of its services. Here's a handy list:

  • Google Docs: doc.new or docs.new
  • Google Sheets: sheet.new or sheets.new
  • Google Slides: slide.new or slides.new
  • Google Forms: form.new or forms.new
  • Google Sites: site.new or sites.new
  • Google Calendar: cal.new or cals.new

You'll agree, it's convenient. But besides being convenient, it's also interesting. What if other companies start taking the same approach.

Imagine: creating a new post on Facebook or Twitter with fb.new and x.new. Composing a new email with gm.new. Even opening a blank canvas in Figma via fg.new. The possibilities are endless, aren't they?

This is a prime example of how innovation can simplify our routine. Despite seemingly insignificant, these features can save a few seconds every day, a few minutes every month, and a few hours every year. And besides time, there's the resource of attention. In the end, the most important thing is to make technology work for us, not the other way around.

Remembering such a simple command is much easier than remembering a series of steps to achieve the same result. It's akin to knowing a direct route to a destination instead of a winding path.

Imagine implementing them into your work routine or even teaching them to coworkers. The entire team could benefit from a smoother and faster process.

Unfortunately, not everyone is aware of these ways to reduce time, so many continue to take the long way around. Google itself doesn't mention this feature anywhere (or I haven't seen it) - although it would seem like it should.

Another problem stems from the first - if Google see that this method is not used much and decide to abandon it? It must cost a pretty decent amount of money to renew a few short domains.

If for some reason these routes are canceled, users who are used to them may feel disoriented.

So be bold and start using them!

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